About us

Greene & Greene is a long established firm of solicitors based in Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk. Our lawyers advise individuals and businesses based all over the UK.

We regularly attract new clients who have been using firms in London, but now receive a more cost efficient and more personal service from us here in Bury St Edmunds.

agr (1) Agriculture & Farming (9) Arbitration (2) Articles (11) Bribery Act (1) Business (36) Business Law (2) Charity (1) Charity Fundraising (9) Children Issues (10) Cohabitation (11) Collaborative Law (4) Commercial (9) Commercial Property (12) Compromise Agreements (5) Construction Law (1) Consumer (3) Contracts (2) Copyright (1) Corporate and M&A (18) Corporate Finance (7) Debt Recovery (2) Defamation (1) Development Rights (1) Dispute Resolution (48) Disputed Wills (6) Divorce (14) Divorce and Separation (27) Education (1) Employment (43) Employment Advice (23) Employment Law (28) Employment Rights (15) Employment Tribunal (15) Environment Agency Prosecutions (2) Environmental Law (5) Expert Witnesses (1) Family Businesses (6) Family Law (35) Family Mediation (9) fFamily Mediation (1) Freedom Workshop (1) GDPR (1) General (14) Health & Safety (2) Inheritance Tax (2) Insolvency & Bankruptcy (1) Insurance (3) Intellectual Property (4) Landlord & Tenant (7) Lasting Powers of Attorney (4) Lawyers (3) Legal Update (6) Letter of Claim (2) Marriage (11) Motoring (12) Pension (1) Personal Affairs (13) Personal Injury (9) Pre-nuptial Agreements (5) Professional Advisers (4) Professional Negligence (3) Profile (2) Property (18) Property Disputes (18) Redundancies (7) Renewable Energy (2) Residential Conveyancing (7) Scams (1) Selling (1) Selling Company (1) Seminar (2) Small Claims (1) SME (1) Social Media (2) Tax (5) Tax Planning (6) Terms and Conditions (2) Trusts (6) UKELA (1) Unfair Dismissal (5) Wills & Estates (14) Wind Farm (2) Workshop (2) wWills & Estates (1)

Topics


Contributors


Monthly Archives

Entries in Property (18)

Wednesday
Dec062017

5 Top Tips when Purchasing a Property

Purchasing a property is exciting, but it is undoubtedly a stressful time. Conveyancing Solicitor, Jemma Jones from Greene & Greene, explains how to take the stress out of your purchase by providing several tips to help your transaction run smoothly

1)   Be Prepared

You will, of course, have already considered how you are going to finance your property purchase.

If you are financing the purchase with a mortgage, you may need to seek the advice of a financial advisor or a bank to check that you are able to obtain sufficient funding. 

Perhaps it is the bank of mum and dad or another relative providing assistance.  If so, they will need to have any necessary funding available for use.  You will also need to think about whether the assistance will be a gift, a loan or will they become a part owner of the property? 

More often than not, a deposit of 10% must be paid on entering into the purchase contract.  You should have this ready for use.  If you are also selling a property the deposit may come from further down the chain but please note you may be required to “top up” the deposit to the full 10% if the deposit is less.

You will be required to provide identification to your solicitor.  This should be dealt with at an early stage to prevent holding up the transaction.

2)   Have a Survey Undertaken

The conveyancing process is based on the principle of “buyer beware” and, generally speaking, after exchange of contracts you will have no recourse to the seller for any defects in the property.

A full structural survey should be carried out if it is a period or listed property, if it has been subject to alterations or if alterations are planned.  In other cases a Home Buyers Report may be appropriate. A Surveyor can advise on the type of survey most appropriate to you.

3)   Read and Keep all Documents

During the transaction your solicitor will report to you on all aspects of the purchase, including searches, plans and the title to the property. 

As your solicitor is unlikely to have visited the property you are purchasing, you should check any plans of the property are correct and that any rights or restrictions on the property do not restrict what you would like to do at the property.

You should also retain any certificates or guarantees that you receive during the transaction as you will need to provide these to any purchaser when you sell the property.

4)   Be Patient

The average conveyancing process takes approximately 6 weeks to get to the point of exchange of contracts (when you become contractually bound to purchase the property) and then a further 2 weeks or so to completion.  If you are purchasing a leasehold property, the timescales may be slightly longer.

 Should you be in a chain, any completion dates will need to be agreed by all other buyers and sellers in the chain.  It is important that you communicate with your solicitor in order that you are kept updated on progress.

5)   Choose the Right Solicitor

In order to have your matter dealt with smoothly it is important to have the right legal team behind you.  An experienced and approachable firm who provide an efficient and personal service will help keep the process as stress-free as possible.  You should be able to speak directly with the person dealing with your matter, who should be a qualified practitioner and able to advise you on all aspects of your transaction.

If you would like a no obligation quotation in respect of your purchase or any other conveyancing transaction please contact us at mail@greene-greene.com or call 01284 762211.  For more information on the services offered by Greene & Greene Solicitors please visit www.greene-greene.com and follow on Twitter @GreeneGreeneLaw

* This article previously appeared in the Winter 2017-18 edition of Rooftops Magazine.

Thursday
Aug102017

Is your property at risk from fraudsters?

Fraud is an ever growing problem and it can affect all areas of our lives. Jemma Jones, a Solicitor, in Greene & Greene’s residential conveyancing team tells us why property fraud is no exception.

Property fraud can be committed in several different ways. The most frequently reported cases involve a fraudster using your identity to sell your property or securing a mortgage over your property.  You may have no idea that the fraud has taken place until a sold sign is put up outside the property or you receive requests for payment of the mortgage.

There are several groups of people who are more at risk of being a victim of property fraud and these include people who:

  • Have had their identity stolen;
  • Rent out their property;
  • Live overseas but have a property in the UK;
  • Have an empty property;
  • Have an un-mortgaged property; and
  • Own a property that is not registered at the Land Registry.

However, there are a number of ways that you can protect yourself against property fraud:

  • Having your property registered at the Land Registry -   By doing this they will have your contact details and can contact you if they are concerned that a fraudulent transaction is occurring.  When registering the property, you can provide up to three addresses that will enable them to contact you.  You can also include an e-mail address.
  • Sign up to the Land Registry Property Alert Scheme – This is a free service that notifies you if there is significant activity in respect of a property you are monitoring.  You can monitor up to 10 properties. Details of the Property Alert Service can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/property-alert

  • Keep your contact details up to date with the Land Registry – The Land Registry can only contact you if they have the correct details for you.
  • Adding a restriction to your title – If your property is registered or you are purchasing a property that you will not be living in, a restriction can be added to the title so that if the property is sold or mortgaged, a certificate has to be provided to confirm that the person who is selling the property is who they say they are. 

If you would like any assistance with registering your property or adding a restriction to your title please contact Jemma Jones in our Conveyancing Department at jemmajones@greene-greene.com or by calling 01284 717522 (Direct).

For more information on the services offered by Greene & Greene Solicitors please visit www.greene-greene.com and follow on Twitter @GreeneGreeneLaw.

Wednesday
Mar012017

Free Residential Property Law Update

                  

Join our expert lawyers, Jonathan Mathers (Agriculture & Residential Property), Ansa Khan (Residential Property) and Natalie Stoter (Private Client & Taxation) on Thursday 16th March at Denny Bros Conference Suite, Bury St. Edmunds for this informative seminar updating you on the latest property law issues.

Areas to be covered include:

  • A review of the last 12 months;
  • Property Fraud;
  • Incoming energy efficiency rules;
  • Issues for buy-to-let investors;
  • Stamp duty exemptions & reliefs; and
  • Looking forward to 2017/18.

You will also have the opportunity to ask questions of the speakers on any property law issues that may be of specific interest to you.

Denny Bros Conference Suite, Kempson Way, Bury St. Edmunds, Suffolk, IP32 7AR

8.30am                Registration & Continental Breakfast

9.00am                Seminar followed by Q & A session

10.30am              Refreshments & Close

To book your free place(s) at the seminar please email joolswindermere@greene-greene.com.

Please contact us if you are unable to attend this seminar but would be interested in joining us on an alternative date or running an in-house property update for your leadership team.

For more information on the services offered by Greene & Greene Solicitors please visit www.greene-greene.com and follow on Twitter @GreeneGreeneLaw.

Friday
Feb102017

New Partner at Greene & Greene Solicitors

Tim Mendes da Costa, a member of the Commercial Property team has been promoted to Partner having joined Greene & Greene Solicitors who are based in Bury St. Edmunds in 2014.

Tim qualified as a solicitor in 2006 and was previously a Partner with a firm in London.  Clients have been impressed with Tim’s “diligence, thoroughness and sound advice”.  He specialises in both commercial and high-value residential property transactions and acts for a broad range of clients, from individual purchasers and sellers, to developers, landlords, lenders and investors.

Chris Thomson, Senior Partner at Greene & Greene, said:

When Tim Mendes da Costa joined us two years ago, we quickly realised that he would be a valuable member of the Commercial Property team.  Greene & Greene has a long standing reputation for delivering the service our clients expect and deserve and Tim’s new role as Partner will only strengthen that.”

For further information please telephone Jools Windermere on 01284 717430, visit www.greene-greene.com and follow @greenegreenelaw.

Friday
Jan292016

Flooding: An Act of God?

The dreadful effects of flooding have been graphically illustrated once again by the events in Cumbria, Lancashire, Yorkshire and areas of Scotland over the course of the past few weeks. In legal terms flooding is often described as an act of God: in other words it is something for which no person can be held responsible. This is not always true for, on occasions, those affected by flooding can have a legal remedy.

If the way in which a landowner or occupier uses or manages his land generates flooding that would otherwise not have occurred or makes flooding worse, he may be liable for those consequences on a number of grounds, including negligence and nuisance.

We have successfully pursued flooding claims for a number of clients. Two examples include: -

  1. Recovering compensation for a client whose house was repeatedly flooded following a change of use of the adjoining farmland by its owners, which resulted in water run off whenever it rained heavily.
  2. Establishing liability against a landowner who mismanaged the repair and maintenance of, and the drainage associated with, a large pond on her land with the result that it overflowed during periods of heavy rain and flooded our client’s property. Our client’s compensation ran into hundreds of thousands of pounds.

If you have been affected by flooding or are worried about your responsibilities as a landowner or occupier please contact Michael Batty (michaelbatty@greene-greene.com / Telephone 01284 717414) or Andrea Nicholls (andreanicholls@greene-greene.com / Telephone 01284 717531) in our Dispute Resolution Team.  For more information please visit http://www.greene-greene.com/energy.html and follow @greenegreenelaw.

Monday
Jan112016

Farmers Weekly: What to do if escaped stock cause damage by Andrea Nicholls

(This article was first published in Farmers Weekly, 4 December 2015)

Question:               My stock have escaped and damaged my neighbour’s property what should I do and am I liable to pay for damage to their lawn for example?

Answer:                  Yes.  Your liability for damage caused to property by straying livestock (and the legal definition of livestock includes all the usual farm stock species) is a strict liability.  This means that there is no need for the person whose property has been damaged to prove that you were at fault in any way in allowing the animals to stray.

If your stock stray you are liable to pay both for the damage which they cause to property and any costs which the property owner incurs in controlling or looking after the animals. 

You are liable to pay for the damage caused to the lawn and any costs that the lawn owner incurs in looking after the animals. It is best to collect the animals as soon as possible and pay for the damage.

Question:               Who is liable to pay for damage caused to property?

Answer:                  The person in possession of the livestock is liable to pay for any damage to property caused by straying livestock. The person “in possession” includes both the owner of the livestock and the owner of the grazing land from which the stock escaped. Either person can be sued and any savvy property owner would probably sue both. If you are grazing someone else’s stock on your land, you must agree as part of the Grazing Licence how liability for damage for strays is going to be shared.

Click to read more ...