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Greene & Greene is a long established firm of solicitors based in Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk. Our lawyers advise individuals and businesses based all over the UK.

We regularly attract new clients who have been using firms in London, but now receive a more cost efficient and more personal service from us here in Bury St Edmunds.

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Monday
Jan162017

Top Tips on Separation

The breakdown of a relationship is never easy, especially from a legal point of view. If you are thinking about separating from your partner, our “top tips” can help make the process a little less stressful…

Sort out your finances

Money can cause all sorts of problems during a relationship, let alone after separation. Get your finances in order early on to avoid unnecessary angst.  

If you have joint bank accounts or credit cards consider whether these should be closed or cancelled. If you intend to keep using them you will need to agree how much money can be spent and who will be responsible for paying any debt. You should also consider restricting any overdraft facilities.

If you have a more complicated financial situation it may be sensible to seek advice from an accountant. They can provide advice on tax consequences following the transfer of property or company assets.

Consider the needs of the children

Arrangements for child care including when and where the children will spend time with each parent should be discussed and agreed particularly if you are about to separate..

You will need to consider how joint decisions about children will be made in the future. A parenting plan could be drawn up (see www.splittingup-putkidsfirst.org.uk).   This can be as detailed as required and can also include issues such as how and when the children would be introduced to any new partners. 

Ideally the amount and frequency of Child Support payments should be agreed as in default an application to the CMS for a Child Maintenance Service assessment may be necessary.  If there are no children or if Child Support payments are insufficient to cover one party’s financial needs then thought should be given to any additional support that may be needed by way of Interim Spousal Maintenance. 

Think about getting help

A lot of people are reluctant to consider getting help, but counselling can often be very helpful in coping with the stress of relationship breakdown.

If you think it could help to try and get the relationship back on track thought should be given seeing a marriage counsellor. If the relationship is at an end then a family therapist, family consultant or counsellor could help work through issues surrounding the separation and communication.

Work out sensible living arrangements

Will both parties still be living in the house together?  Sometimes this will be a necessity.  Consider any practical steps that can be taken to make this easier.  Alternatively, if one person intends to leave then who will that be and where will they go?  Importantly, consider how two households would be funded.

Update your Wills

Consider whether the terms of your will are still applicable post-separation. You may want to remove certain beneficiaries. You should also consider whether any death in service benefits under any pension provision need to be amended.

Seek legal advice early on

We deal with things like this every day and have considerable experience in these matters. We are committed to providing constructive dispute resolution options and sensible advice. Seeking legal advice early on can help avoid problems down the line.

If you require any advice about separation contact Melanie Pilmer (melaniepilmer@greene-greene.com, telephone 01284 717418) or another member of the Family Team at Greene & Greene for an initial discussion.   For more information on the services offered by Greene & Greene please visit www.greene-greene.com and follow Twitter @GreeneGreeneLaw.